Birthstones

Pearl Insights: Baroque Pearls

By Baggins Pearls The word Baroque comes from the Portuguese word “barroco,” which refers to a pearl with an elaborate shape. It was during the Baroque Era (1600–1750) that these non-round pearls were first used in jewelry, hence the name, which doubles as a reference to the luxuriant art and architecture of the period. Baroque pearls are irregularly shaped or “imperfect” pearls and they come in almost all varieties of South Sea pearls; White or Champagne South Sea, Tahitian, and Golden. Their organic beauty captivates the attention. Each unique shape is more appealing than the other. No two Baroque pearls

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The Folklore of Topaz

Traditional legends claimed that topaz could harness the power of the sun. This gemstone is commonly found in warm yellow hues, but can be treated to produce other colors, such as blue. Pink topaz was linked to spring and summer, while other topaz colors were linked to fall. Topaz symbolized the Egyptian Sun god, Ra. Ancient Egyptians felt it was an incredibly powerful stone. Hindus believed in the gemstone’s protective abilities. They felt it could protect homes from burning down, while also protecting their health and beauty. African shamans also treated the gemstone as sacred, using it in their healing rituals. They

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The Folklore of Citrine

Citrine has been loved for thousands of years. The word was first used in 1385 to refer to yellow gemstones. This November birthstone has become a symbol of manifestation, wealth, and imagination. Its yellow hues evoke the warmth of the sun and life-giving energy. In ancient times, people believed that citrine gemstones could calm tempers, soothe anger, and manifest desires. To leverage these powers, Egyptians used citrine gemstones as talismans, the ancient Greeks carved iconic images into them, and Roman priests fashioned them into rings. Legends say that the gemstone made men more handsome and intelligent. It was also believed

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The Folklore of Tourmaline

Tourmaline gemstones are found in an incredible range of colors. An Egyptian legend explains this variety by saying the gemstone traveled along a rainbow, gathering the diverse array of colors as it went. One legend relates tourmaline to the world’s ancient knowledge. Magicians living in the Andes mountains used tourmaline to create magical staffs to access this resource. Ancient Indian ceremonies used tourmaline for enlightenment and help in seeking good. Inversely, they felt it could also bring insight as to what was causing trouble. In the 18th Century, a Dutch scientist believed that wrapping a tourmaline gemstone in silk and

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The Folklore of Opal

The folklore around opal gemstones has changed over the centuries. It has long been associated with hope, happiness, innocence, and luck. According to Arabic legend, opals fell from the sky in bolts of lightning. Greek mythology stated that opals originated from Zeus’ joyful tears after winning the battle against the Titans. Meanwhile, Australian aborigines believed that the Creator came to Earth on a rainbow, leaving these colorful stones where his feet touched the ground. Aztecs named fire opal after Quetzalcoatl, their feathered-serpent diety. They believed the “Stone of the Bird of Paradise” could foster creativity and beginnings. They felt it

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The Folklore of Sapphire

Sapphires are associated with focus, self-discipline, and channeling higher powers. This gemstone has been referenced in almost all religions. Learn more.

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The Folklore of Spinel

Spinel has often been confused with ruby. It comes in a variety of colors, including red, black, blue, and purple. Learn more about this August birthstone.

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The Folklore of Sardonyx

For thousands of years, people wore peridot beads and talismans to promote love, happiness, and wealth. Learn about the lore behind this August birthstone.

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The Folklore of Peridot

For thousands of years, people wore peridot beads and talismans to promote love, happiness, and wealth. Learn about the lore behind this August birthstone.

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The Folklore of Rubies

In ancient times, the ruby was considered more valuable than diamonds. Many cultures considered it a token of wealth, safety, and passion. Learn more.

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