Birthstones

The Folklore of Bloodstone

Bloodstone was believed to have healing powers, especially for blood disorders. Find out why it’s been called the “martyr’s stone” and learn other legends.

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The Folklore of Garnet

According to folklore, January’s birthstone represented eternal happiness, health, and wealth, making it appropriate for the start of the year. Learn more.

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The Folklore of Amethyst

Legends and myths about amethyst abound. People have believed that February’s birthstone could improve intelligence, focus, and peace. Learn more about this gem.

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Make the Season Bright With Tanzanite

Sleighbells ring, are you listening? December’s birthstone, pretty and glistening A beautiful sight Blue tanzanite Sparkling in a winter wonderland Tanzanite is the primary birthstone for December, along with zircon and turquoise. Found only in Tanzania, it is also the gemstone for a 24th wedding anniversary. If you’ve made it to 24 years of marriage, you definitely deserve the gift of tanzanite! If it’s not your birthstone or an anniversary gift, tanzanite still makes a perfect present for the holidays. Being blue never looked so good. Are you feeling tantalized by tanzanite? Visit an American Gem Society (AGS) jeweler and

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Color Comes Into Play with October’s Birthstones

When it comes to color, October birthstones give you some amazing choices. Whether you choose opal or tourmaline, you’ll get a display of exciting and intense colors, making them popular choices for jewelry designers and collectors. Opal The name “opal” derives from the Greek opallos, meaning “to see a change (of color).” They range in color from milky white to black with flashes of yellow, orange, green, red, and blue. An opal’s beauty is the product of contrast between its color play and its background. Opal is a formation of non-crystalline silica gel that seeped into crevices in the sedimentary

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Corundum of Many Colors: Sapphire

As we turn our calendars to September, we start thinking of things like heading back to school, sipping on a pumpkin spice latte, and planning our fall fashions. For those celebrating a birthday in September, they’re thinking of their birthstone: sapphire! Although sapphire typically refers to the rich blue gemstone variety of the mineral corundum, this royal gem actually occurs in a rainbow of hues. Sapphires come in every color except red, which would then be classified as ruby. Trace elements like iron, titanium, chromium, copper, and magnesium give naturally colorless corundum a tint of blue, yellow, purple, orange or

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