October Birthstones | How to buy the Tourmaline Gemstone

OCTOBER BIRTHSTONES

Tourmaline

How to Buy Tourmaline



No two tourmaline gemstones are exactly alike, which makes this a one-of-a-kind gift for any individual—especially someone celebrating an October birthday or an eighth wedding anniversary.

With a wide variety of colors, qualities, and sources available, there’s tourmaline jewelry to suit a range of styles and budgets. Like diamonds, tourmaline is evaluated by the criteria of: color, clarity, cut, and carat weight.

Color
In general, darker toned tourmaline that appears black is priced lower than brightly colored material. Rubellite tourmaline, in shades of pink or red, is one of this gemstone’s most desirable colors.

Green and blue tourmaline are also popular, though the most striking shades of these colors come from Brazil’s exotic and rare Paraíba tourmaline. Prices can run $10,000 per carat, making this the most valuable variety of tourmaline.

Clarity
Inclusions are common in tourmaline, because liquid inclusions and crystals can get trapped during formation. It’s not uncommon for red or pink tourmaline to display visible inclusions, but inclusions can lower the value of other colors, depending on their visual impact.

Some tourmaline material, especially rubellite, undergoes heat treatment to improve color. Other tourmaline is clarity-enhanced to remove inclusions, which can significantly lower the value.

Cut
Because tourmaline forms in slender, columnar crystals, many finished gemstones have long, irregular shapes.

Tourmaline gemstones tend to absorb light differently down the length of a crystal, versus than across it. This optical property is called “pleochroism,” which means they appear different colors from different directions—so the cut is critical.

Carat Weight
Tourmaline can come in a range of sizes, but Paraíba tourmaline is rare in sizes larger than one carat. But with these stones, color is more highly valued than size, so a small, brightly colored gemstone is preferred over a large, dark one.

With such a wide range of tourmaline options available—from the common, inexpensive schorl to the highly-valued Paraíba—the price of tourmaline gemstones can vary greatly.

Find a jeweler near you for the right tourmaline birthstone jewelry for you.


Jeweler Map

Find a Jeweler

Search for an American Gem Society member jewelry store.

Search

SIGNUP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

Would you like to hear more about the latest news, tips, and trends on fine jewelry and gems? Look no further than your inbox! Sign up today to receive our e-newsletter, Brilliance.

Sign Up

Mission Statement

The American Gem Society (AGS) is a nonprofit trade association of fine jewelry professionals dedicated to setting, maintaining and promoting the highest standards of ethical conduct and professional behavior through education, accreditation, recertification of its membership, gemological standards, and gemological research.

The Society is committed to providing educational products to inform and protect the consumer and to contributing to the betterment of the trade by creating industry standards to protect the jewelry-buying public and the fine jewelry industry as a whole.

AGS Laboratories, founded to support the AGS mission, is a nonprofit diamond grading laboratory with a mission of consumer protection. Adhering to the AGS Diamond Grading Standards, AGS Laboratories is dedicated to offering diamond grading reports that provide consistency and accuracy based on science.

American Gem Society

8881 W. Sahara Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89117

info@ags.org (866) 805-6500